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Home WHAT’S NEW Reflections Reflections over Morning Coffee

Reflections over Morning Coffee

Pat HaggertyReflections over Morning Coffee
Spiritual site in a noisy world…

By Pat Haggerty



Good and Faithful PDF Print E-mail

God bless our veterans!By Pat Haggerty

Throughout the gospels we are called upon to do many things and to be many things.  We are asked to be like little children (Luke 18:17); we are prompted to be cheerful givers (2Corinthians 9:7); and we are asked to forgive (Luke 6:37).  In the gospel for the Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, we are asked to use our talents wisely.

In Matthew’s gospel (25:14-30), we hear about the parable of the man who gave his servants some talents.  Two of the servants took those talents and multiplied them.  The third servant buried the talent out of fear and returned it to his master as it was given.  What does this parable say to us?  Do we use the gifts God has given us?  Do we live in fear and not develop what is in us?  Do we nurture the talents that we have, celebrating them as gifts from God?

Last Updated on Monday, 10 November 2014 12:24
 
Saints PDF Print E-mail

Pat HaggertyBy Pat Haggerty

It seems that every family has a month that is particularly loaded with birthdays and anniversaries. That holds true for us, and the month is October. There is my grand-daughter’s birthday, my daughter and son-in-law’s anniversary, my husband’s birthday, my son-in-law’s birthday---and so it goes.

Like birthday celebrations, feast days are days of importance in the Church. Looking at a liturgical calendar, it is interesting to note when certain saints are celebrated. It is even more interesting to read a vignette of the saint’s life. October is of particular interest, as many well-known saints have their feast days during this month. Among them are Thérèse of Lisieux, the Little Flower, on October 1; Francis of Assisi, founder of the first Friars Minor, on October 4; Teresa of Avila, the great saint of Carmel, on October 15; Luke, physician and evangelist, on October 18; and John Paul II, a saint of our times, on October 22.

Last Updated on Saturday, 25 October 2014 15:10
 
Change our Hearts PDF Print E-mail

Pat HaggertyBy Pat Haggerty

Fall is my favorite season!  I just love the changing leaves, the crisp air and the brisk mornings.  Everything about it makes me sensitized to the grandeur of God’s creation and to the blessings He bestows on us through the beauty of nature.  It is as if the earth is resplendent with a multi-colored quilt created just for us.

Last week I was driving to work and had to visit a school in a fairly rural setting of Massachusetts.  At one point during my drive, I had to stop the car.  I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the surrounding landscape.  The foliage was breath-taking.  I paused for a few moments to take it all in---the transformation that had taken place in the trees was astounding.  I had to thank God for that moment and for the picturesque canvas of color surrounding me.

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 October 2014 11:55
 
Connecting with God PDF Print E-mail

Pat HaggertyBy Pat Haggerty

This morning, when I turned on my iPad, I wanted to check my email.  I was told to “join a network.”  Obviously I had lost my internet connection.  That often happens on a computer too.  You are directed to “connect to a network.”  It all sounds so friendly---“join,” “connect,” or “choose a network.”  It’s as if they want us to connect and belong.  That’s all well and good until we experience frustration over a slow connection or the inability to find a network.  That’s when our patience is put to the test.  We accept it, though, as part of what we do in this era of technology and social media.

This got me thinking.  Our ability to connect with God is so much simpler!  We don’t have to connect to a network; we already are connected to His network.  All we have to do is ask for His help, call Him in prayer and seek Him in our hearts.  The point is we need to reach out to God.  He is always there waiting for our knock.

 
Honoring Labor PDF Print E-mail

Pat HaggertyBy Pat Haggerty

It used to be that Labor Day marked a transition for most of us.  It was the beginning of the school year and the official end of summer.  These days, schools start at various times during the end of August and the beginning of September.  Labor Day is still a guidepost for the end of summer activities and the projection of cooler days in the fall.  Most families have their end of summer cook-outs on Labor Day and their final summer festivities on that day.  My Labor Day consisted of a visit to a local Country Fair and a family cook-out on the lake.  It was both fun and bittersweet knowing that leisure times were over and schedules and routines would take their place.

Labor Day became a federal holiday over 120 years ago.  It was introduced as a day of celebration for laborers and was initiated by the labor unions of that time.  It has been celebrated in various manners since then.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 03 September 2014 09:44
 
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